Brain Hammer

I’ve been reading mind and brain blog Brain Hammer recently – written by philosopher and cognitive scientist Pete Mandik.

Philosophers are increasingly becoming indispensable, as training in the history and practice of philosophy makes people well-suited to tackling some of difficult problems thrown up by contemporary cognitive science.

If you’re not sure what philosophers do exactly, think of them as ‘conceptual engineers’ – pushing forward new theories and fixing existing ones to make sure they are coherent and fit the data as best as possible.

The majority of mind and brain blogs are written by clinicians, psychologists and neuroscientists and so it is refreshing to see regular writing from someone engaged at the pit-face of the philosophy of mind.

As well as being Mandik’s personal blog where he shares his thoughts, it’s also where summaries from the Philosophy of Mind and Science Work in Progress group are published.

The PMS-WIP group is an online forum for the discussion of developing ideas and theories in the philosophy of mind, cognitive science, and related areas.

UPDATE: Grabbed from the comments: I also recommend to everyone Gualtiero Piccinini’s blog philosophyofbrains.com – thanks Anibal!

Link to Brain Hammer.

One Comment

  1. Posted November 17, 2006 at 11:39 pm | Permalink

    Pete Mandik´s blog could hardly be more stimulating, exciting and pedagogical in those complex terrains of mind/brain studies from a philosophical perspective.
    I also recommend to everyone Gualtiero Piccinini¬¥s blog called “Brains: On Mind and Related Matter” (philosphyofbrains.com, check of course its blogroll and contributors!) and the forum of a new movement within philosophy championed by philosophers such as Joshua Knobe, Shaun Nichols or Edouard Machery, to name just a few, called: Experimental Philosophy.
    All of them teach me always with their cyberexchanges.


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