Misha

Hi,

My name is Mijail “Misha” Serruya, and I’m grateful for the opportunity to join the other MindHacks editors to share my passion for basic and clinical neuroscience.

I finished my combined MD/PhD training at Brown University, helped co-found Cyberkinetics, and am currently a House Officer in internal medicine in Providence, and expect to begin a residency in adult neurology at the University of Pennsylvania next year. You can learn more about my previous experience here and my future plans here.

Declaration of Conflict of Interest: I am shareholder of Cyberkinetics and I have been an employee of the company in the past.

I welcome you to email me questions about brain-computer interfaces, advocacy for people with neurologic and psychiatric disability, and clinical neurology, but I can’t promise a fast response time.

Cheers!

Vaughan

I’m one of the contributors to the book and have been kindly asked to write for mindhacks.com. I’m a clinical and research psychologist and there’s more about my work at my staff page.

You can find me on Twitter here (@vaughanbell) where I also post various mind and brain snippets.

License:
I write because I enjoy it. I don’t get paid so my best return is that people are kind enough to read my work. I release all my writing on this site under the Creative Commons Attribution License v 2.0. This means you can copy and re-publish my work anywhere, without my permission, as long as you don’t pass it off as your own.

To be fair though, I’m hardly going to get lawyers involved if you do rip off my stuff, so if you don’t have the courtesy to acknowledge where the article came from, fine, you’re rude. I’ll just take it as a rather ill-conceived complement.

Full disclosure:
The words are all my own, they’re not paid for, and are written because I enjoy it. We don’t take paid adverts. Any product I mention is because it’s caught my eye. When there might be a conflict of interest I will endeavour to recognise this and mention it in the post. Most pertinently, I am an occasional columnist and unpaid associate editor for The Psychologist, and am an unpaid member of the editorial board for the excellent open-access science journal PLoS One.

Occasionally, publishers will offer to send us a free book, or will send us one out of the blue. If I mention a book on the blog, I will state if it was sent for free. I will not necessarily mention a book just because you send us a copy. We do not always accept the offers. Actually, this rarely happens and so far, most books that I’ve mentioned are my own or from the library.

I’ve occasionally noticed posts about your own papers…
Aren’t you just promoting your own work?

Well spotted. If you’re a researcher you should too. Write your research up as a short, accessible, jargon free summary and post it on the net. Science should be accessible to everyone and the net is the perfect place to set it free. If it’s about the mind, brain or human behaviour, let us know and we’ll feature it.

Matt

I guess I should introduce myself. I’m Matt Webb, I co-authored the book with Tom. Hello! Mostly I post notes to my personal weblog, Interconnected, and sites that I run across to the Mini Links–that’s probably the best way to find out what I’m interested in. What I’m not is a psychologist or neuroscientist (my day job is in social software, internet stuff), but I’ve been immersed in the academic literature for the past N months. Hopefully that means I’ll be able to bridge some of these brain ideas over to the tech world, which is the one I usually inhabit.

It has been great fun writing Mind Hacks. Actually, what was possibly more fun was trying out all the experiments, mucking around with mirrors, or a pendulum, or sitting by the road watching the traffic. I’m aiming to post the same kind of stuff here, things to try at home (or on your friends), and to do the same as in the book: dig a little deeper, see what’s really happening in our heads. If there’s something you think we should give a go, email in. If it’s not too embarrassing I’ll put photos up.

Tom

Hello. And I’m Tom Stafford, the other author of the book. While I was doing my degree and PhD I kept notes on lots of funny little things in psychology and neuroscience, although I never really knew why I was doing it. Then along came Matt and the idea for the book, and I had a place for many of the things I’d jackdawed over the years. But they were just enough to get us going. The rest of Mind Hacks me and Matt discovered during our Summer of Book – and that was a hell of a ride I can tell you. All summer we kept finding out new exciting things, and we knew that we’d only have time or space for a fraction in the book. Hopefully some of them will end up on this weblog, along with other things out there that we missed. There’s also room for all the discussions we didn’t have in the book, about all the wider issues raised by this stuff, and especially about different implementations of the hacks we suggested. I’m looking forward to finding out some more cool things and having some cool conversations on mindhacks.com…I hope you’ll join us.