2010-05-14 Spike activity

Quick links from the past week in mind and brain news:

The Pentagon jumps on the brain implants for everything bandwagon but suggesting they could be a treatment for trauma, according to a piece in Wired. Shorter tours of duty like other coalition forces apparently not an option.

The Neurocritic has CASES OF INJURY OF THE HEAD, ACCOMPANIED BY LOSS OF BRAIN (oozing from the skull). Dig those old skool neurology cases.

Some of the best visual illusions are rounded in a gallery by Scientific American.

Overcoming Bias has a fantastic follow-up to our post on the ‘unskilled and unaware of it’ effect on subsequent studies that show the effect’s limitations and ways of manipulating it.

The psychological aftershocks of the Haiti earthquakes are covered in a powerful piece from the LA Times.

Science News on a study finding how bereaved relatives are helped by chance to view body after sudden loss, even in cases of violent death.

Independent walking robots made of DNA at Not Exactly Rocket Science. Yeah you heard, Mr ‘I Think You’ve Seen Terminator One Too Many Times’. Bunkers, now!

The Telegraph covers a case of a woman unable to recognise people by their voice.

Doctors are desensitised to other people’s pain, says a study covered by the BPS Digest. Can’t wait for the follow-up on dentists.

The New York Times discusses the science of a happy marriage. Doesn’t mention the difficult to achieve ability of noticing new female haircuts without prompting.

Near misses fuel gambling addiction according to a new study covered by Neurophilosophy.

There’s a video of the Best Illusion of the Year over at Scientific American. Clearly came out after the UK coalition government formed.

Faculty of 1000 discuss a paper finding that MRI affects brain activity. Let the weeping commence.

Want a career in social neuroscience? The Science careers blog has a post especially for you.

The Guardian reports that BBC4 are to screen a documentary following patients as they are sectioned (‘committed’) to psychiatric hospital. Wow.

There’s an interesting discussion on the philosophy of illness and our relationship to our bodies over at ABC Radio National’s Philosopher’s Zone.

Wired covers a recently released document giving some new information on the origins of the CIA’s MKULTRA ‘mind control’ project.

So, like what’s happened to Furious Seasons?

BBC Radio 4 has a great series on lie-detection and lie-detectors.

Men, teaching may be bad for your marriage, at least according to a study covered by NCBI ROFL. Being surrounded by beautiful women apparently.

The Wall Street Journal discusses Carl Jung’s mysterious ‘Red Book’ and an exhibition currently based on the tome. Article has awesome first paragraph.

Olivia Judson discusses if its possible to enhance the placebo effect at The New York Times.

Scientific American Mind’s Twitter feed has just become awesome.

Married neuroscience tag team Chris and Uta Frith discuss their life and work on BBC Radio 3′s Night Waves.

The Guardian has a piece on how mental illness is a low development priority despite it being a major cause of disability in the developing world.

A study raises questions about the role of brain scans in courtrooms and is ably covered by Not Exactly Rocket Science.

6 Comments

  1. Posted May 15, 2010 at 2:36 am | Permalink

    Hm, seems the wrong link is associated with “BBC Radio 4 has a great series on lie-detection and lie-detectors.”

  2. Posted May 15, 2010 at 2:39 am | Permalink

    Ah, I see it’s simply a mis-typed url. It should be:
    Ehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p007gvhg

  3. Posted May 17, 2010 at 1:19 am | Permalink

    Now fixed. Thank you!

  4. Susanne
    Posted May 17, 2010 at 6:48 pm | Permalink

    “So, like what’s happened to Furious Seasons?”
    Well, he met his quarterly fund raising goal of $4,000 in the first week of January and then disappeared with the money a month later. No explanation, no reply to e-mails, no offer of refunds to people who donated in good faith. Nothing.
    It’s fraud and I know a few other people in online groups who are just as upset at being taken advantage like this. These are who people don’t have money to just throw away. It’s so completely hypocritical of him given the rhetoric he used against money and the pharmaceutical industry to get people to donate in the first place.

  5. Posted May 18, 2010 at 7:10 pm | Permalink

    Philip Dawdy is still blogging, not at Furious Seasons but http://sensiblewashington.org/, about a campaign for marijuana decriminalization in Washington State.
    He said in his last FS post that “With luck, I may be back to semi-regular posting in the near future, but until my hours back off to, say, 70 hours a week I am simply unable to do much of anything non-campaign related including eating and sleeping. But I will be back. Guaranteed.”

  6. Susanne
    Posted May 19, 2010 at 2:23 pm | Permalink

    How and when will I get the refund from what I donated to Furious Seasons?
    That fraud.
    Do you have any idea how many people are angry with him for taking them for fools? No one wants an explanation. Just give give them their money back.
    Luckily with the economy these days an e-mail to the IRS gets a pretty prompt response.


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