2008-08-15 Spike activity

Quick links from the past week in mind and brain news:

Sharp Brains has a thoughtful piece on the hoped-for demise of dementia.

Peter Donnelly gives an excellent TED talk on how juries are fooled by statistics.

Channel N finds an interesting video lecture on the conditioned fear response and combat resilience in the armed forces.

Apparently we’re a ‘Top 100‘ Mental Health and Psychology Blog.

The Frontal Cortex has an interesting summary of a study on basketball pros and the mirror system. A nice complement to a study on ballet dancers and capoeira experts.

Is being gay in your biology? All in the Mind investigates.

The Situationist has an interesting piece on “The Psychology of Barack Obama as the Antichrist”. Cor blimey!

An interesting project to visualise sound to help deaf people interact with sound is covered by BBC News – with video of it in action.

Wired Science picks up on a new study that finds that placebos work better in children.

Cool! Artwork that displays separate images under different lighting conditions – with videos.

Furious Seasons has an excellent investigative piece on the fact that the FDA seem to be validating new psychiatric diagnoses off their own backs.

The most conceptually confused headline of the year? “Nature Or Nurture: Are You Who Your Brain Chemistry Says You Are?” Actually a study on addiction.

Is psychoanalysis equivalent to a spiritual practice? A commonly made link between psychoanalysis and religion is explored rather deftly in an article for The Immanent Frame.

The BPS Research Digest has an interesting piece on disaster psychology and why so many people perish needlessly in emergencies.

More from the Hot Spanish Psychologist. ¬°Vaya chica!

Not Exactly Rocket Science covers a fascinating study showing that referees have a tendency to award more points to competitors wearing red.

3 Comments

  1. Posted August 15, 2008 at 9:44 am | Permalink

    Isn’t it called “Not Exactly Rocket Science,” not “Not Quite Rocket Science”?

  2. Posted August 15, 2008 at 10:03 am | Permalink

    Hi Ben, you’re quite right. Now fixed!

  3. fishmonkey
    Posted August 15, 2008 at 12:57 pm | Permalink

    The part on visualising sound reminded me of work on turning vision into sound. There’s a sensory substition device called the vOICe (http://www.seeingwithsound.com/) which does such a thing – the sounds it makes can actually produce activity in visual cortex. Interesting to see somebody going the other way round, turning sound into vision.


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